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Counter Offers - They Don't Work

So, you’ve decided to look for a new job, you have applied for roles, interviewed, been offered and now you’re handing in your notice. (Let’s face it, you’ve been on a brave journey up to this point, as looking for a new role can be daunting and overwhelming). Your Manager says, “please don’t leave, we’ll increase your salary and offer you a promotion”. Naturally, the comfort of staying in a company you know, with a team you like, can make you wonder, “perhaps I should stay? They’re offering me more money and progression – why would I leave? Am I making the wrong move?”.

Well, we urge you to remember, there is a reason/reasons why you started looking for work in the first place and typically, we see people who are counter offered looking for a new role within 6-12 months.

Did your job search start because:

  • You are feeling overlooked in your role?
  • You want to try a new industry?
  • You feel underpaid?
  • You were overlooked for a promotion?
  • Promises are not being delivered?
  • You are bored and want more challenging work?
  • Your Manager isn’t supporting you?
  • The distance is too much?
  • Flexibility is limited?

Our guess would be, whatever your reasons are for looking for a new role, you will have considered them, attempted to fix the issues, and resolve the problems/concerns.

So, we ask you - if you have explored all options to stay in your role and still want to leave; you have accepted change needs to happen, and you proactively found a new job which recognises your potential, fulfils your career goals and is more closely aligned to your career path, why would you suddenly want to stay in a job just because your Manager has decided to pay you more money, and/or recognise your value in the team?

If money has been a catalyst for you to change roles, and you’ve asked for an increase before, we would wonder why you were not considered as “valuable enough” to be given a pay rise until handing in your notice – why now? We would go as far as to say, we feel it is not because you’ve suddenly become a more “valuable” member of staff, it’s because your Manager is facing a commercial decision and weighing up the time and cost for hiring your replacement, and the prospect of dealing with the work disruption from you leaving your role.  Yes, read that again.  It is not because you’ve suddenly become a more “valuable” member of staff, it’s because your Manager is facing a commercial decision and weighing up the time and cost for hiring your replacement, and the prospect of dealing with the work disruption from you leaving your role.

If you are in the position of being counteroffered, take time to digest the offer and reflect on your original reasons as to why you began the search process. If you stay, will all your concerns and worries have vanished forever? Think about it. Will they have gone – never to return? Our experience tells us “no”.

So, when you go to hand in your notice, we suggest you consider these three steps:

  1. Have you considered all the reasons why you’re looking for a new role?
  2. Have you tried to find a solution and remedy these concerns with your Manager?
  3. If you have answered “yes” to the above two steps and you’re still looking for a new job, practice saying, “no, thank you”. As when you hand in your notice and a counteroffer comes, you’re ready to politely say, “no, thank you” and walk towards the horizon of your career path, and your journey of personal development

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